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Campbell evidence and gap maps

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Search Result: 63 Records found
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Recovery schools for improving behavioral and academic outcomes among students in recovery from substance use disorders
  • Authors Emily A. Hennessy, Emily E. Tanner-Smith, Andrew J. Finch, Nila Sathe, Shannon Kugley
  • Published date 2018-10-04
  • Coordinating group(s) Education, Social Welfare
  • Type of document Title Protocol Review Plain language summary
  • See the full review https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.4073/csr.2018.9
Deployment of personnel to military operations: impact on mental health and social functioning
  • Authors Martin Bøg, Trine Filges, Anne Marie Klint Jørgensen
  • Published date 2018-06-01
  • Coordinating group(s) Education, Social Welfare
  • Type of document Title Protocol Review Plain language summary Other Data
  • See the full review https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.4073/csr.2018.6
Reducing unemployment benefit duration to increase job-finding rates
  • Authors Trine Filges, Anders Bruun Jonassen, Anne-Marie Klint Jørgensen
  • Published date 2018-02-28
  • Coordinating group(s) Social Welfare
  • Type of document Title Protocol Review Plain language summary
  • See the full review https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.4073/csr.2018.2
Effectiveness of interventions to reduce homelessness
  • Authors Heather Menzies Munthe-Kaas, Rigmor C Berg, Nora Blaasvær
  • Published date 2018-02-28
  • Coordinating group(s) Social Welfare
  • Type of document Review Plain language summary
  • See the full review https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.4073/csr.2018.3
Interventions to improve the labour market outcomes of youth: a systematic review of training, entrepreneurship promotion, employment services and subsidized employment interventions
  • Authors Jochen Kluve, Susana Puerto, David Robalino, Jose Manuel Romero, Friederike Rother, Jonathan Stöterau, Felix Weidenkaff, Marc Witte
  • Published date 2017-12-04
  • Coordinating group(s) Education, International Development, Social Welfare
  • Type of document Title Protocol Review Plain language summary
  • See the full review https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.4073/csr.2017.12
Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) for improving health, quality of life and social functioning in adults
  • Authors Michael de Vibe, Arild Bjørndal, Sabina Fattah, Gunvor M Dyrdal, Even Halland, Emily E Tanner-Smith
  • Published date 2017-11-01
  • Coordinating group(s) Social Welfare
  • Type of document Title Protocol Review User abstract Plain language summary Previous version
  • See the full review https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.4073/csr.2017.11
Effect of early, brief computerized interventions on risky alcohol and cannabis use among young people
  • Authors Geir Smedslund, Sabine Wollscheid, Lin Fang, Wendy Nilsen, Asbjørn Steiro, Lillebeth Larun
  • Published date 2017-04-07
  • Coordinating group(s) Social Welfare
  • Type of document Title Protocol Review Plain language summary
  • See the full review https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.4073/csr.2017.6
Mindfulness-based interventions for improving cognition, academic achievement, behavior and socio-emotional functioning of primary and secondary students
  • Authors Brandy R Maynard, Michael Solis, Veronica Miller, Kristen E. Brendel
  • Published date 2017-03-10
  • Coordinating group(s) Education, Social Welfare
  • Type of document Title Protocol Review Plain language summary
  • See the full review https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.4073/CSR.2017.5
12-step programs for reducing illicit drug use
  • Authors Martin Bøg, Trine Filges, Lars Brännström, Anne-Marie Klint Jørgensen, Maja Karrman Fredriksson
  • Published date 2017-02-15
  • Coordinating group(s) Social Welfare
  • Type of document Title Protocol Review Plain language summary Data
  • See the full review https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.4073/csr.2017.2
Advocacy interventions to reduce or eliminate violence and promote the physical and psychosocial well-being of women who experience intimate partner abuse
  • Authors Carol Rivas, Jean Ramsay, Laura Sadowski, Leslie Davidson, Danielle Dunne, Sandra Eldridge, Kelsey Hegarty, Angela Taft, Gene Feder
  • Published date 2016-01-04
  • Coordinating group(s) Social Welfare
  • Type of document Review Plain language summary
  • Library Image Library Image
  • See the full review https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.4073/csr.2016.2
  • Records available in English, Spanish
  • English

    PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARY

    Limited evidence and limited effects of advocacy to reduce intimate partner violence

    Intensive advocacy may improve everyday life for women in domestic violence shelters and refuges, and reduce physical abuse. There is no clear evidence that intensive advocacy reduces sexual, emotional, or overall abuse, or that it benefits women’s mental health. It is unclear whether brief advocacy is effective.

    What is the review about?

    Partner abuse or domestic violence includes physical, emotional, and sexual abuse; threats; withholding money; causing injury; and long lasting physical and emotional health problems. Active support by trained people, which is called ‘advocacy’, may help women make safety plans, deal with abuse, and access community resources.

    Advocacy may be a stand-alone service, accepting referrals from healthcare providers, or part of a multi-component, and possibly multi-agency, intervention. It may take place in the community, a shelter, or as part of antenatal or other healthcare, and vary in intensity from less than an hour to 80 hours.

    Advocacy may contribute to reducing abuse, empowering women to improve their situation by providing informal counselling and support for safety planning and increasing access to different services.

    What is the aim of this review?

    This Campbell systematic review assesses the effects of advocacy interventions on intimate partner violence and women’s wellbeing. The review summarizes findings from 13 studies.

    What were the main findings of the review?

    What studies are included?

    This review summarizes evidence from 13 clinical trials comparing advocacy for 1,241 abused women with no care or usual care. Most studies followed up on the women for at least a year.

    Does advocacy reduce intimate partner violence and improve women’s wellbeing?

    Physical abuse: After one year, brief advocacy had no effect in two healthcare studies and one community study, but it reduced minor abuse in one antenatal care study. Another antenatal study showed reduced abuse immediately after brief advocacy, but women were also treated for depression, which may have affected results. Two studies provided weak evidence that intensive advocacy reduces physical abuse up to two years after the intervention.

    Sexual abuse was reported in four studies, which found no effects.

    Emotional abuse: One antenatal care study reported reduced emotional abuse at 12 months after advocacy.

    Depression: Brief advocacy prevented depression in abused women attending healthcare services and pregnant women immediately after advocacy. Intensive advocacy did not reduce depression in shelter women followed up at 12 and 24 months. The moderate-to-low quality evidence came mostly from studies with a low risk of bias.

    Quality of life: Three trials of brief advocacy trials no benefit on quality of life. Intensive advocacy showed a weak benefit in two studies in domestic violence shelters and refuges, and a primary care study showed improved motivation to do daily tasks immediately after advocacy.

    What do the results mean?

    Intensive advocacy may improve everyday life for women in domestic violence shelters and refuges in the short term, and reduce physical abuse one to two years after the intervention. There is no clear evidence that intensive advocacy reduces sexual, emotional, or overall abuse, or that it benefits women’s mental health. It is unclear whether brief advocacy is effective, although it may provide short-term mental health benefits and reduce abuse, particularly in pregnant women and those suffering less severe abuse.

    Several studies summarised in this review are potentially biased because of weak study designs. There was little consistency between studies, with variations for advocacy given, the type of benefits measured, and the lengths of follow-up periods, making it hard to combine their results. So it is not possible to be certain how much or which type of advocacy interventions benefit women.

    How up-to-date is this review?

    The search for this review was updated in April 2015.

  • Spanish

    Click on 'Download PDF' on the right to view the plain language summary in Spanish.

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